Cecil’s Garden

Cecil and his brother Gary have been tending our vines for the last couple of years.  Cecil’s out there day after day in all sorts of weather — hoeing weeds, tucking vines, pulling leaves, pounding posts, deploying netting — doing whatever needs to be done to help us grow high quality wine grapes. It’s only with the help of local hardworking, trustworthy farmers like them that we can keep everything going. A couple of weeks ago, we noticed a plant growing in the bed of Cecil’s truck.  With the consistent rains and sunshine this summer, the scant soil there stayed moist and warm enough to incubate some sort of plant. We marveled at the tenacity of nature, the faith of this plant to take root

Cecil's Garden

Cecil and his brother Gary have tended our vines for the last couple of years. Cecil’s out there day after day in all sorts of weather — hoeing weeds, tucking vines, pulling leaves, pounding posts, deploying netting — doing whatever needs to be done to help us grow high quality wine grapes. It’s only with the help of local hardworking, trustworthy farmers like them that we can keep everything going. A couple of weeks ago, we noticed a plant growing in the bed of Cecil’s truck. With the consistent rains and sunshine this summer, the scant soil there stayed moist and warm enough to incubate some sort of plant. We marveled at the tenacity of nature, the faith of this plant to take root in suc

A Lazy Sunday in the County

We’re into the last month of summer now. Veraison — the ripening event where the grapes transform from green to purple and gold — is well under way. Sunflowers are in full bloom beside the winery and a gentle breeze rustles in the poplars. Bees buzz through our pumpkins’ just-blooming flowers, alongside pumpkins that are like green basketballs. My enterprising girls Ellie and Anika set up a table beside the pathway into the winery, offering ice water made with refreshing mint from the garden. A great day to be in the country and a lazy summer Sunday to be thankful for.

Frost, Flood, and Drought – That’s Farming!

Last year we filled the empty areas in our fields with 2.5 more acres of vines.  Often, people ask for a more full-bodied red, so we added an acre of Cabernet Franc. We expanded our Pinot Gris plantings, and we completed our Chardonnay vineyard. Planting day was in late June 2014, because it was too wet for the planting crew to operate their big machinery until then.  After which, we hit the characteristic County dry spell in July and August (so dry, even the rabbits have to carry their own water, laughs my farmer neighbour).  The result was the new plantings weren’t quite able to develop the root systems and growth that they normally would have. In mid-May this year, we had a glimpse of sum

Sarments de Vignes

We cut grape vines into four-inch-long pieces to use in our charcoal barbecue Steve wears a cooking mitt on his left hand because the sarments de vignes burn so hot. He’s cooking pinot noir-infused lamb sausage for guests at our recent bus tour. There is nothing like a barbecue in the vineyard — lamb sausage, infused with Broken Stone pinot noir, roasted over charcoal and seared with sarments de vignes. Sarments de vignes means “branches of the vines”.  Cooking over burning grape vines is popular in France. At the French equivalent of Canadian Tire, you can even purchase a bag of vine fragments to use in your barbecue. In our experimenting we found that grape vines burn very fast and hot — p

Project Pumpkin

Visitors to the winery will notice a patch of low-growing vines to the left of the parking lot.  Pumpkins! No, we’re not making pumpkin wine, although we’ve thought of the possibilities (a Harry-Potter-esque cinnamon spiced sweet wine). It’s for a fundraiser for our daughter’s hockey team.  One of the Hockey Moms said to me, Tim, why don’t we get the girls to sell pumpkins in the Fall?  You’ve got lots of land, pumpkins are easy to grow… Sure! So here we are with 88 pumpkin plants sprawling in our garden.  They have really cool day-of-the-triffids flowers right now! On the first weekend in October at our Harvest Party, hopefully the Scarborough Sharks Bantam A girls hockey team will descend

Broken Stone Winery

524 Closson Road | Prince Edward County |  Ontario | Canada

K0K 2J0

© 2017 by Broken Stone Winery Ltd.

  • Trip Advisor Social Icon
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • Google+ Social Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon